irony, sarcasm

 Irony is the use of words to convey a contradiction between the literal and intended meanings. Sarcasm is very like irony except that it is more stinging. Where the primary intent behind irony is to amuse, with sarcasm it is to wound or score points.

Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors. 2013.

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  • irony, sarcasm —    Irony is the use of words to convey a contradiction between the literal and intended meanings. Sarcasm is very like irony except that it is more stinging. Whereas the primary intent behind irony is to amuse, with sarcasm it is to wound or… …   Dictionary of troublesome word

  • Irony/sarcasm — The cornerstones of British humour. This is one of the biggest differences between the nations. The sense of humour simply doesn t translate too well …   The American's guide to speaking British

  • Irony punctuation — This article is about punctuation marks used to indicate irony or sarcasm. For the mirrored question mark used in Arabic and other languages that use Arabic script, see Mirrored question mark. ؟ Irony punctuation …   Wikipedia

  • irony — irony1 /uy reuh nee, uy euhr /, n., pl. ironies. 1. the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning: the irony of her reply, How nice! when I said I had to work all weekend. 2. Literature. a. a technique of… …   Universalium

  • irony — i|ron|y [ˈaıərəni US ˈaırə ] n plural ironies [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: ironia, from Greek eironeia, from eiron person who lies ] 1.) [U and C] a situation that is unusual or amusing because something strange happens, or the opposite of… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Sarcasm — is stating the opposite of an intended meaning especially in order to sneeringly, slyly, jest or mock a person, situation or thing. It is strongly associated with irony, with some definitions classifying it as a type of verbal irony intended to… …   Wikipedia

  • Sarcasm — Sar casm, n. [F. sarcasme, L. sarcasmus, Gr. sarkasmo s, from sarka zein to tear flesh like dogs, to bite the lips in rage, to speak bitterly, to sneer, fr. sa rx, sa rkos, flesh.] A keen, reproachful expression; a satirical remark uttered with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sarcasm — index diatribe, irony, ridicule Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • sarcasm — satire, irony, *wit, humor, repartee Analogous words: incisiveness, trenchancy, bitingness, cuttingness (see corresponding adjectives at INCISIVE): mockery, taunting, derision (see corresponding verbs at RIDICULE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • sarcasm — [n] mocking remark acrimony, aspersion, banter, bitterness, burlesque, causticness, censure, comeback, contempt, corrosiveness, criticism, cut*, cynicism, derision, dig*, disparagement, flouting, invective, irony, lampooning, mockery, mordancy,… …   New thesaurus

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